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Our relationship with the Center for Spectrum Services has developed into one of close partnership… From the initial evaluation to the process of school-age placement, the Center for Spectrum Services staff have demonstrated their dedication to the needs of the children. Dolores Ellsworth
Kingston School District, Chairperson, Committee on Preschool Special Education
Tips From Our Experts

 

 
Using Video Modeling to Teach New Skills

 

Nancy Uttendorfer, MS, CCC-SLP

Video Modeling is a visual teaching method that occurs by watching a video of someone modeling a targeted behavior or skill and then imitating the behavior/skill watched.
Video Modeling is a simple and effective teaching tool that motivates children to learn through a fun and enticing visual medium.

How is Video Modeling Used?
The student watches the model demonstrating the skill/skills. Repeated viewing of the skill enhances learning.
After watching the video multiple times, the student begins to imitate skills from the video.
The student then begins to generalize or utilize that skill in his or her natural environment. This usually requires repetition and practice in the environment.

Why Use Video Modeling?
It is easy and motivating.
Fun and engaging videos promote a child’s desire to interact with the video.
Children learn in a naturalistic environment.
The videos can be viewed repeatedly, and children often enjoy watching scenes repeatedly.
Prompting and reinforcement may not be necessary to learn from a video.
Videos give us the ability to teach an endless array of skills, behaviors, language, social communication skills, etc.
Videos can provide an opportunity to teach multiple skills within one video scenario.
Children with ASD are visual learners, naturally drawn to video and other visual inputs. Video modeling for children with autism is a natural “fit” for teaching all types of skills.
Children identify with peers and models similar to them, and are therefore engaged when watching them.
Children are often motivated to watch themselves performing the new skill, once they have learned it.
Children with ASD may be more comfortable learning from a video rather than face to face interactions.

How do I get started?
There are some commercially produced videos available for purchase, e.g. Watch Me Learn, Model Me Kids, but children often enjoy home-made videos that use family members as the actors!